Liberation Through Hearing The Art of Dying

Tze-Si Huang

$22.95

Liberation through Hearing, or more fully, The Great Liberation through Hearing in the Intermediate States (bar-do thos-grol chen-mo), has become widely known by its descriptive nickname used in the West, The Tibetan Book of the Dead. These secret teachings are attributed to the 8th century Indian Buddhist Master Padma Sambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, and are thought to have then been hidden in Tibet. Such a text is regarded as a “treasure” or terma (gter ma) text to be rediscovered later, as this one was by Karma Lingpa in the 14th century.

A number of legends have grown around Padma Sambhava’s life and deeds, and he is widely venerated as a ‘second Buddha’ across Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Himalayan states of India. The Nyingma School considers Padma Sambhava to be a founder of their tradition.

A person of any tradition who is inspired or who wishes to be liberated from the cycle of existence and attain enlightenment in the process of dying, can apply these step by step teachings. The author of this profound and beautifully illustrated book has been a Buddhist practitioner for more than 30 years.

 Liberation through Hearing, or more fully, The Great Liberation through Hearing in the Intermediate States (bar-do thos-grol chen-mo), has become widely known by its descriptive nickname used in the West, The Tibetan Book of the Dead. These secret teachings are attributed to the 8th century Indian Buddhist Master Padma Sambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, and are thought to have then been hidden in Tibet. Such a text is regarded as a “treasure” or terma (gter ma) text to be rediscovered later, as this one was by Karma Lingpa in the 14th century.
A number of legends have grown around Padma Sambhava’s life and deeds, and he is widely venerated as a ‘second Buddha’ across Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Himalayan states of India. The Nyingma School considers Padma Sambhava to be a founder of their tradition.

 

Category:

  • Paperback
  • 112

Product Description

The Venerable Bhakha Tulku Rinpoche speaking about the new Fons Vitae book “Liberation through Hearing – The Art of Dying” by Padma Sambhava (Guru Rinpoche) (8th century) (Translated by TZE-SI HUANG and illustrated by DEMI.  Liberation through Hearing, or more fully, The Great Liberation through Hearing in the Intermediate States (bar-do thos-grol chen-mo), has become widely known by its descriptive nickname used in the West, The Tibetan Book of the Dead. These secret teachings are attributed to the 8th century Indian Buddhist Master Padma Sambhava, also known as Guru Rinpoche, and are thought to have then been hidden in Tibet. Such a text is regarded as a “treasure” or terma (gter ma) text to be rediscovered later, as this one was by Karma Lingpa in the 14th century. A number of legends have grown around Padma Sambhava’s life and deeds, and he is widely venerated as a ‘second Buddha’ across Tibet, Nepal, Bhutan, and the Himalayan states of India. The Nyingma School considers Padma Sambhava to be a founder of their tradition. A person of any tradition who is inspired or who wishes to be liberated from the cycle of existence and attain enlightenment in the process of dying, can apply these step by step teachings. The author of this profound and beautifully illustrated book has been a Buddhist practitioner for more than 30 years. — Each of us, no matter our religion or belief, would like to assist our loved ones in the final transition of life – death and dying. I have found the Buddhist approach to death by far the most civilized for both the person passing and the bereaved family and friends. I have used several more complex forms of the Phowa (Tibetan Buddhist death and transition practices) but this small, beautifully illustrated volume offers a simple set of daily prayers providing a bridge to be travelled hand in hand with the dying. This holy process allows both the bereaved and the passing soul to find comfort.- Rae Hatherton, ND, Toronto, Canada.

Reviews

Each of us, no matter our religion or belief, would like to assist our loved ones in the final transition of life – death and dying. I have found the Buddhist approach to death by far the most civilized for both the person passing and the bereaved family and friends. I have used several more complex forms of the Phowa (Tibetan Buddhist death and transition practices) but this small, beautifully illustrated volume offers a simple set of daily prayers providing a bridge to be travelled hand in hand with the dying. This holy process allows both the bereaved and the passing soul to find comfort.
Rae Hatherton, ND, Toronto, Canada.