Thomas Merton Series

Merton and Indigenous Wisdom -New Title

Peter Savastano

$27.95

Edited and with an Introduction by Peter Savastano

“We owe an enormous debt to the Indians, and we should begin by recognizing the spiritual richness of the Indian religious genius. There is great hope for the world in the spiritual emancipation of the Indians.” –Thomas Merton, The Courage for Truth. Letter to Pablo Antonio Cuadra, 1958

Thomas Merton believed that the essential values of Christianity, the embrace of the dignity of all men and of the Sacred, are also reflected in the wisdom traditions of the Indigenous Peoples of the Americas. Merton studied the richness of Native American culture and spirituality which illustrate how these peoples embrace the Sacred as the foundation of their lives and of the Earth, that the ecological conscience as well as the social conscience are the basis of justice and peace.

The essays included in this 7th volume of the Fons Vitae Merton Series, serve as spiritual exercises for exploring Merton’s globally inclusive religious imagination, helping us to drink from springs of ancient views and practices. They help us to not only recognize the damage of European colonization, but to taste indigenous American wisdom as a still-living sacrament for our collective salvation – Jonathan Montaldo, General Editor

A new translation of his “Preface for Latin American Readers” is a significant manifesto of Merton’s universality and “catholic” approach to the phenomenon of seeking God and the Sacred in all the world’s cultures. The essays included are replete with passages from Merton’s writings and transcriptions from his recovered weekly talks to the novices at the monastery of Gethsemani, where he lived until his untimely death in 1968. Merton and Indigenous Wisdom, gathers reflections that expose Merton’s appreciation for the spiritual and religious genius of American and Canadian indigenous peoples.

Introduction by Peter Savastano and Essays by Vine Deloria, Jr., Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Barbara Mainguy, Robert G. Toth, Donald P. St. John, William Torres, Kathleen W. Tarr, Allan M. Macmillan and Malgorzata Poks. Including a new translation of Merton’s Preface to Obras Completas I by Marcela Raggio

 

Product Description

The Fons Vitae publishing project for the study of world religions through the lens of Thomas Merton’s life and writings brings Merton’s timeless vision of all persons united in a “hidden ground of Love” to a contemporary audience. The previous six volumes in our series – Merton and Sufism, Merton and Buddhism, Merton and Judaism, Merton and Taoism, Merton and the Protestant Tradition, Merton and Hesychasm – feature essays by international scholars that assess the value of Merton’s contributions to inter-religious dialogue.

This seventh volume in our series, Merton and Indigenous Wisdom, gathers reflections that expose Merton’s appreciation for the spiritual and religious genius of American and Canadian indigenous peoples. A new translation of his “Preface for Latin American Readers” is a significant manifesto of Merton’s universality and “catholic” approach to the phenomenon of seeking God and the Sacred in all the world’s cultures. The essays included are replete with passages from Merton’s writings and transcriptions from his recovered weekly talks to the novices at the monastery of Gethsemani, where he lived until his untimely death in 1968.

“We owe an enormous debt to the Indians, and we should begin by recognizing the spiritual richness of the Indian religious genius. There is great hope for the world in the spiritual emancipation of the Indians.” –Thomas Merton, The Courage for Truth. Letter to Pablo Antonio Cuadra, 1958

“I have a clear obligation to participate, as long as I can, and to the extent of my abilities, in every effort to help a spiritual and cultural renewal of our time. To emphasize and clarify the living content of spiritual traditions by entering deeply into their disciplines and experiences, not for myself only but for all my contemporaries. This for the restoration of man’s sanity and balance, that he may return to the ways of freedom and peace, if not in my time, at least some day soon.” –Turning Toward the World: The Pivotal Years.. The Journals of Thomas Merton, Volume 4, 1960-1963

Peter Savastano is an Episcopal Priest. He holds a BA in Religious Studies and Philosophy from Montclair State University and an M.Phil and PhD. in Religion and Society from Drew University. His areas of expertise are: the Anthropology of Religion with a focus on Christian (Anglican, Catholic and Orthodox) mysticism, vernacular devotional practices, and issues of sexuality and gender in relation to Anglicanism, Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy; Islamic Mysticism (Sufism) and Western Esotericism; the Anthropology of Consciousness with a focus on trance, and other psi phenomena such as spontaneous healing, visionary experiences, NDEs and premonitional dreams; World Indigenous sacred ritual and healing traditions, most especially American Indian traditions and African Diasporic traditions. He has been studying the works of Thomas Merton since early adolescence and teaches a course entitled Thomas Merton, Religion and Culture. Peter Savastano is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Religious Studies at Seton Hall University in South Orange, New Jersey.

Jonathan Montaldo was the Director of Bethany Spring, the Merton Institute for Contemplative Living’s Retreat Center in New Haven, Kentucky. He has edited numerous volumes of Thomas Merton’s writing including The Intimate Merton, Dialogues with Silence, A Year With Thomas Merton, Choosing to Love the World: Thomas Merton on Contemplation, and Bridges to Contemplative Living with Thomas Merton (nine volumes).

With Virginia Gray Henry, the publisher, he is the co-general editor of the Fons Vitae Thomas Merton Series that examines Merton’s interests in Sufism, Hesychasm, Judaism, Buddhism, Taoism, the Protestant Tradition, Merton and the Indigenous World, We are Already One, and the forthcoming Merton and Hinduism.

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REVIEW by Robert Toth

Merton & Indigenous Wisdom
Edited by Peter Savastano

Robert G. Toth served as the executive director of the Merton Institute for Contemplative Living from 1998 to 2009, when he took the position of director of special initiatives for the institute.

Merton & Indigenous Wisdom is a long overdue examination of Thomas Merton’s interest in and concern for Indigenous peoples. Throughout the book the reader hears Merton’s historical voice, spiritual voice and prophetic voice educating us, stirring our conscience and calling us to action. The chapters co-authored by Lewis Mehl-Madrona and Barbara Mainguy review the extent to which Merton examined and understood Indigenous history, culture and spirituality and point to areas that require deeper exploration in the context of our current understanding of Indigenous peoples experience. Of particular importance is the example of how Merton’s concept of self and the Lakota lack of such a concept demonstrates that an Euro-American worldview and categories of thought that often do not correspond to Indigenous worldviews and categories.

Each of the other chapters primarily reference two of Merton’s works, Ishi Means Man, a collection of five essay/reviews of books on indigenous people and his poem The Geography of Lograire. They augment and offer contemporary insights on Merton’s perspectives, concerns, and exploration of indigenous spiritual practices.

In Indians of the Americas by John Collier, Merton would have read, “The deep cause of our world agony is that we have lost the passion and reverence for human personality, and for the web of life, and the earth which the American Indians have tended as central, sacred fire since before the Stone Age. Our long hope is to renew that sacred fire in us all.” Peter Savastano indicates Merton’s first step toward reigniting the sacred fire was “divesting his mind from the prison of his ethnocentric, imperialistic attitudes and beliefs, all of which he inherited from the European and Euro-American perspectives that had shaped his life and his education.”

The “long hope” is that we join Peter’s students who enthusiastically identified with Merton as a model of their need to be decolonized from the narratives and fictions they have learned as the true and only way the world operates.

 

Reviews

I have a clear obligation to participate, as long as I can, and to the extent of my abilities, in every effort to help a spiritual and cultural renewal of our time. To emphasize and clarify the living content of spiritual traditions by entering deeply into their disciplines and experiences, not for myself only but for all my contemporaries. This for the restoration of man’s sanity and balance, that he may return to the ways of freedom and peace, if not in my time, at least some day soon. America is still an undiscovered continent. My vocation is American—to see and understand and to have in myself the life, the roots, the belief, the destiny, and the orientation of the whole hemisphere— as an expression of something of God, of Christ, that the world has not yet found out—something that is only now, after hundreds of years, coming to maturity.
Turning Toward the World: The Pivotal Years. The Journals of Thomas Merton, Volume 4, 1960-1963
Merton & Indigenous Wisdom is a long overdue examination of Thomas Merton’s interest in and concern for Indigenous peoples. Throughout the book the reader hears Merton’s historical voice, spiritual voice and prophetic voice educating us, stirring our conscience and calling us to action.
Robert Toth